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Kreischer Optics Profile

Kreischer Optics and MRF® Polishing: A powerful combination

In the Kreischer Optics Conference Room hangs a framed newspaper dated Monday, July 10, 1933.  The front page shows a photograph of 17 year-old “newsie”, Emil Kreischer next to the telescope he made from scratch, which began his lifelong love of optics.  He founded Kreischer Optics in 1948, grinding and polishing lenses in a tiny one-room apartment in his spare time.  In 1986, his son, Cody became the first fulltime Kreischer Optics employee and remains the CEO to this day, directing 13 fulltime employees.  The one-room apartment has gradually become an 8,400 square foot manufacturing facility, with an addition currently underway, that will soon house a 16,200 square foot manufacturing facility.

Cody Kreischer learned of MRF technology in the 1990’s, and watched the development with interest.  For Kreischer Optics, the best application of MRF technology was in the area of aspherics.  Since the MRF technology still required a pre-polish method, Kreischer waited.  By 2007, Kreischer Optics had become an established manufacturer of aspheric optics.  “Starting with highly skilled technicians and our versatile polishing  methods, we are now ready for MRF technology to take us to the next level of accuracy.”  states Kreischer.
Cody Kreischer learned of MRF technology in the 1990’s, and watched the development with interest.  For Kreischer Optics, the best application of MRF technology was in the area of aspherics.  Since the MRF technology still required a pre-polish method, Kreischer waited.  By 2007, Kreischer Optics had become an established manufacturer of aspheric optics.  “Starting with highly skilled technicians and our versatile polishing  methods, we are now ready for MRF technology to take us to the next level of accuracy.”  states Kreischer.

After observing the QED Q22-XE at Optifab in 2007, it only took a week to decide to add MRF technology to the Kreischer Optics manufacturing abilities.  The lenses used for training were part of a 24-piece order that needed to be polished to a .2-micron accuracy.  They shipped the initial batch to the customer, who called before even completing their testing.  “Our parts were so much better than their previous vendor, they placed an order for 32 more.”  Kreischer went on to describe how this success has opened other doors for Kreischer Optics, “Although they are still in the pre-production phase, they anticipate ordering over 400 next year.  In addition, we have orders for spherical and cylindrical optics that go into the same system!”

Initially skeptical of QED’s claims, Kreischer is pleased that it does exactly what he was told it would do.  The Master Optician running the equipment agreed, saying that it is predictable, and that once he has made correct measurements, all of the lenses he has attempted so far have been successful.  Although he recognizes its value in precision spheres and flats, Kreischer Optics keeps their new MRF machine busy making aspheres.  Kreischer explains, “Aspheres are much more metrology driven, so we need the experience of our opticians to get the maximum capabilities from the machine.”

Learn more about Kreischer Optics at http://www.kreischer.com/